I’m A Fad

On one of my comment threads the fabulous author Mak of I Want Ice Water introduced me to a link about Bipolar Disorder being more prevalent in Americans, now while I don’t go against science on this one and I am not someone who holds a PhD behind my name nor do I play a doctor on TV, I do have an opinion on this one.  Well I have an opinion on a lot of things but I’ll try to stay on topic for this one.

I often think that being diagnosed with something, anything is something that American’s do or look into.  Seriously hear me out here.  Much like when I was a teenager and if you didn’t have braces then you were uncool and didn’t belong in the “in crowd”.  I believe we refer to this as a fad.  A fad is defined in Wikipedia as:

any form of behavior that develops among a large population and is collectively followed with enthusiasm for some period, generally as a result of the behavior’s being perceived as novel in some way.[1] A fad is said to “catch on” when the number of people adopting it begins to increase rapidly. The behavior will normally fade quickly once the perception of novelty is gone. 

 Now I’m not saying that American’s aren’t more prevalent to become Bipolar or have it and not even know or have it and know it but what I’ve seen and read sometimes pisses me off.  When we’re having a bad month or even year we look towards getting a diagnosis from something or someone to explain why we aren’t dealing with life in an okay manner or it gives an individual an excuse not to deal with life on life’s terms in an appropriate manner.  Kind of the same with our children.  An example would include Autism, go ahead raise your hand if you swore to the moon that your kid was Autistic after a series of shots, I know.  I do have a friend who has a son about a year younger than my daughter and he is absolutely with no doubt Autistic.  He was diagnosed at a very early age, about a year old.  Last year my daughter had a friend at school who didn’t do so well with taking orders from adults especially female teachers.  He also was dealing with his parents going through a divorce.  He acted out in any way he deemed necessary for everyone to notice he wasn’t happy in life; sort of the “Look at me, look at me” phase of having to deal with so much.  Well long story short, he smacked my daughter in the face and well umm ya not even gonna happen.  Well the school comes up with the diagnosis for him, “He shows signs of having Autism, he honestly can’t help himself.”  What did Bats think, “BULSHIT!  He smacked my daughter in the face for no reason, I’ll show him how to help himself.”  While I only thought that, what I did say was; “Oh my, may I please see his diagnosis from a doctor?”  See I knew this kid, they played together all of the time and he never showed one sign to me of being Autistic.  He did however show many signs of being a boy who needed his tail paddled, in other words he needed discipline.  I never saw a diagnosis and they never played together again.

I hear people talking all of the time now about Bipolar Spectrum Disorder, and how they think they have signs of it or they know someone who they believe has signs of it.  Sort of a conversation like: hey I think it could be cool to be Bipolar and have the excuse to fuck up occasionally.  What they don’t realize is that’s not what it’s about.  What it’s about is hell, living in a black hole for months, sometimes years at a time and then waking up one morning and not being able to find that black hole to climb back into for weeks, months, years at a time.  And when did there become a gray matter to Bipolar Disorder?  

Another would be ADHD.  My child won’t sit down doctor, they must have ADHD and they medicate the child.  There’s a little boy at my kids bus stop that is 5 and on meds for ADHD.  WHAT?  the hell? 

Now here’s a big one…”I drank last night”, or “boy am I looking forward to tonight I get to drink.  I’m such an alcoholic.”  Always with the giggle at the end.  What is so damn funny about alcoholism?  And when did that become a fad?  Holy Batman!  I’m in the ‘in’ crowd and am too embarrassed to belong publicly to that club. 

I often wonder how many of these people who are getting diagnosed looked it up on the internet before hand?  You can look anything up medically on the internet and just KNOW you have it.  I once thought I was dying of a stroke when in actuality I had a migraine.  I’m not saying a lot of these people don’t have a proper diagnosis of Bipolar Disorder but what I am saying is it just seems to be the new “in” thing to have and I don’t know why anyone would giggle or want to have anything close to this.  I didn’t seek out Bipolar Disorder or my diagnosis of it, I did however seek out detox and then was diagnosed. 

Alright, there’s my opinion if it made any sense at all.  And I know I’m offending about 4% of the population of the US but that’s all it is, an opinion not fact.

15 thoughts on “I’m A Fad

  1. Sorry you are a fad 😦 Some fads are better than others! I think it is dangerous when schools make a diagnosis they can’t support.

  2. Pingback: I’m A Fad | detox cleanse

  3. You hit the nail right on the head with this one. On ALL points. I am always greived when I think of what the (as of yet unknown) long term effects are gonna be with putting so many children on drugs daily for no good reason. Parents use this as an excuse instead of admiting they simply have no discipline, guidance or mentoring in their life and thats what makes them ‘brats’.

    But again parmacy companies are run by milionairs so its in their interest to encourage this fad. And TV backs it up. No wonder people throw diagnoses around like its a toy. So many sheep minded people. Sometimes I feel like its only the ones who have been diagnosed with a real something that are the normal people. If that last bit made any sense Im not sure it did.

    • Pharmacutical companies are one of the biggest scams out there (again another opinion there). When I first was diagnosed are being Bipolar, I was put on a three medications. When I got out of detox I went to get my prescriptions filled and was shocked, I was shocked to the point of needing to pass the hell out. One of the medications cost me $900 a month. Let me say that again $900 a month! Another one cost me $150 a month and the third $10 a month. I was like you’ve got to be kidding me. Now mind you most people have health insurance but we don’t so had to pay all of that out of pocket. The doctors try to make sense of it by saying “Instead of having to take the meds 3-4 times a day, these meds are expensive because you take them once.” Ya well I’m on meds now that I take 3-4 times a day. Screw that shit, $900 a month.

  4. Hi Bats,
    I agree with lifewith4cats – you nailed this. The pharmaceutical companies and the health industry are in bed together milking the sheeple.

    My heart is aching for you $900. per month! That’s insane.

    On a personal note, my mother who is now aged was a bi-polar person who was never diagnosed and never treated. She also suffered from post partum depression. Throughout all the years I went through with her which were not good years I may add, I raised the kids and dealt with her manic phases and all her rock bottom depressions.

     I was home schooled and my dad who worked away from home was never around long enough to see what I could see. My mother was mentally ill. She went through over 40 years without treatment having baby after baby for me to raise, and I also had to care for her when she was down as she became immobilized. It was I who kept our family togther and to this day I am still doing that.

    Meanwhile there are people popping pills who have bever been properly diagnosed and parents who are medicating kids instead of parenting them, and others who have been disgnosed who can’t afford the mediacation they need.

    Oy vey! Some fad that it is, eh?

    {HUG}

    • WOW TT…at first I was thinking “what hell her mother was going through” but then I thought about what you were going through and that trumps your mom anyday of the week. I was the youngest of 3 kids and at the age of 9 was doing my own laundry and making dinner for us 3 kids because my mother was immobile from alcoholism and manic depression/split personality. I get mad because they are the mothers and how dare your mom pass on such a huge responsibility onto you and keep having children? Sigh…ya what a fabulous fad! Thank you for sharing such a personal experience. (((hugs right back atchya)))

  5. …studies like this one drive me nuts. Of course countries with a decent infrastructure and health care system are going to have higher rates of diagnosis… es, or diagnosi (?). It works the same way for cancer, for AIDS/HIV or any other disease. How many bipolar specialists do they think there are in Rwanda?

    This is a great post, bats.

    The problem with diagnosing someone with a mental illness is the diagnosis can be (are generally) wrong the first time. There has to be a follow-up, there has to be actual non-meds treatment / analysis before the meds. If a rambunctious kid is diagnosed with ADHD, there has to be further testing to find out if the kid was having a reaction to something, or just being a kid. They can’t just be dosed and ignored.

    Which brings me to the problem… there are not enough mental health specialists to go around. There’s a small city near me, roughly 60,000 people, it’s a rough town, high unemployment, low literacy rate, high rates of alcohol and drug abuse. It only has five psychiatrists, none of whom are accepting new patients.

    In Toronto, with roughly four million people, it takes up to four years just to see a psychiatrist.

    So what ends up happening is general practitioners, or ER doctors, or therapists, or Walk-In clinics, or just people with no specialized education or understanding of the diseases, end up doing the diagnostics and prescribing for these diseases.

    So if people believe the diseases are being misdiagnosed, or diagnosed too frequently and too quickly, I’d look to who is actually doing the diagnosing.

    I’d also ask the study-people to look at their numbers again… just because 100 people are diagnosed this week with manic depression, it doesn’t mean those 100 people have manic depression. Or that those 100 people will still be treated for manic depression two years from now.

    …about the med cost: Americans pay the highest prices for pharmaceuticals in the world. No one else pays nearly what you’re forced to pay. If you haven’t already, ask your pharmacist if there’s a generic version of the pills you take. There could also be cheaper drugs that might work as well as the one you currently take.

  6. …studies like this one drive me nuts. Of course countries with a decent infrastructure and health care system are going to have higher rates of diagnosis… es, or diagnosi (?). It works the same way for cancer, for AIDS/HIV or any other disease. How many bipolar specialists do they think there are in Rwanda?

    This is a great post, bats.

    The problem with diagnosing someone with a mental illness is the diagnosis can be (are generally) wrong the first time. There has to be a follow-up, there has to be actual non-meds treatment / analysis before the meds. If a rambunctious kid is diagnosed with ADHD, there has to be further testing to find out if the kid was having a reaction to something, or just being a kid. They can’t just be dosed and ignored.

    Which brings me to the problem… there are not enough mental health specialists to go around. There’s a small city near me, roughly 60,000 people, it’s a rough town, high unemployment, low literacy rate, high rates of alcohol and drug abuse. It only has five psychiatrists, none of whom are accepting new patients.

    In Toronto, with roughly four million people, it takes up to four years just to see a psychiatrist.

    So what ends up happening is general practitioners, or ER doctors, or therapists, or Walk-In clinics, or just people with no specialized education or understanding of the diseases, end up doing the diagnostics and prescribing for these diseases.

    So if people believe the diseases are being misdiagnosed, or diagnosed too frequently and too quickly, I’d look to who is actually doing the diagnosing.

    I’d also ask the study-people to look at their numbers again… just because 100 people are diagnosed this week with manic depression, it doesn’t mean those 100 people have manic depression. Or that those 100 people will still be treated for manic depression two years from now.

    …about the med cost: Americans pay the highest prices for pharmaceuticals in the world. No one else pays nearly what you’re forced to pay. If you haven’t already, ask your pharmacist if there’s a generic version of the pills you take. There could also be cheaper drugs that might work as well as the one you currently take.

    — for some reason, for the past month, anytime I comment using my salted lithium URL, WordPress sends my comment straight to the spam filter. So…

    it’s me: http://saltedlithium.wordpress.com

  7. …studies like this one drive me nuts. Of course countries with a decent infrastructure and health care system are going to have higher rates of diagnosis… es, or diagnosi (?). It works the same way for cancer, for AIDS/HIV or any other disease. How many bipolar specialists do they think there are in Rwanda?

    This is a great post, bats.

    The problem with diagnosing someone with a mental illness is the diagnosis can be (are generally) wrong the first time. There has to be a follow-up, there has to be actual non-meds treatment / analysis before the meds. If a rambunctious kid is diagnosed with ADHD, there has to be further testing to find out if the kid was having a reaction to something, or just being a kid. They can’t just be dosed and ignored.

    Which brings me to the problem… there are not enough mental health specialists to go around. There’s a small city near me, roughly 60,000 people, it’s a rough town, high unemployment, low literacy rate, high rates of alcohol and drug abuse. It only has five psychiatrists, none of whom are accepting new patients.

    In Toronto, with roughly four million people, it takes up to four years just to see a psychiatrist.

    So what ends up happening is general practitioners, or ER doctors, or therapists, or Walk-In clinics, or just people with no specialized education or understanding of the diseases, end up doing the diagnostics and prescribing for these diseases.

    So if people believe the diseases are being misdiagnosed, or diagnosed too frequently and too quickly, I’d look to who is actually doing the diagnosing.

    I’d also ask the study-people to look at their numbers again… just because 100 people are diagnosed this week with manic depression, it doesn’t mean those 100 people have manic depression. Or that those 100 people will still be treated for manic depression two years from now.

    …about the med cost: Americans pay the highest prices for pharmaceuticals in the world. No one else pays nearly what you’re forced to pay. You wrote this a while ago, so if you haven’t already, find out from your pharmacist if there’s a generic version of the pills you take. There could also be cheaper drugs that might work as well as the one you currently take.

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